Art Installation Looks like a Glitch in the Real World by Quintessenz
Installation in Old Stone House, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)

Hanover and Berlin-based art duo Quintessenz recently completed a large-scale installation for the contemporary art festival in Provence, where they created a digitally simulated experience known as Paradis Perdus.

The artists Thomas Granseuer and Tomislav Topic, who live in Hanover and Berlin, together form Quintessenz. Since their joint study at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts in Hildesheim (HAWK), Granseuer and Topic have developed their very own, unmistakable signature aesthetic.

With roots in both graffiti and chromatics, Quintessenz merge elements of spray paint, textiles, installation, as well as the digital graphic inside their work. Their large site-specific works and facade murals frequently employs form as the primary idea, whilst also being influenced by visual features found on location.

Entire factory complexes serve as canvases for their colors, the installations are expansive and their murals cover entire facades. Whether in the public space or the gallery, whether three-dimensional or in the surface, their abstract and non-representational works always have one thing in common: their art formally creates space for the color. For Quintessenz, color is not just a mere form; it is its content equally.

Quintessenz’ works of art present an excerpt from their imagery between art and design, between ornamentation and sculpture, between painting and installation. All works share the desire for the abstraction of well-known and unknown imagery and the remix of classical and contemporary means of design.

These ideas are present in their recent installation Flickering Lights, which was was created for Fashion Week Berlin back in January 2018, and Paradis Perdus installed in Les Baux-de-Provence, France in 2017. In both of those installations, and their latest piece in Paxos, the artists use dyed or spray painted fabric in a range of layers as a way to interact with light conditions and points of view.

Although Quintessenz’ installations look incredible when captured on camera, the duo’s distinctive works are always best viewed in person. The artists explain, “We hope that the visitors of our work leave their mobile phone cameras in their pockets for a moment and simply enjoy the light and the translation of the wind in the material.”

Installation in Old Stone House, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)
Installation in Old Stone House, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)
Installation in Old Stone House, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)
Installation in Old Stone House, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)
“Paradis Perdus” (2017), Les Baux-de-Provence, France
“Paradis Perdus” (2017), Les Baux-de-Provence, France
“Paradis Perdus” (2017), Les Baux-de-Provence, France
“Flickering Lights” (2018), created for Panorama Fashion Week in Berlin
“Flickering Lights” (2018), created for Panorama Fashion Week in Berlin
“Flickering Lights” (2018), created for Panorama Fashion Week in Berlin

via [colossal]

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